Posts Tagged With: siberian china

10 Must-Do Jiamusi Activities

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Maybe one day you find yourself in Northern China with a few days to kill.

Or, you’re keen to go where few others go on holiday.

Here are 10 must-do things to enjoy in Jiamusi, in China’s Heilongjiang Province.

We’ve lived here for 18 months and had time to explore, experience and enjoy.

1.  Walk or Cycle the Shongua River Park:  The city is stretched along the bank of the Shongua River which forms the longest Park in Northern China, with beautiful walkways, gardens, Memorials and Statues.  During the day the Park is filled with old people playing board games, playing traditional instruments and taking slow walks.  There is music playing and there are vendors selling balloons, ice-cream and snacks.  At night it lights up with energy, large groups of people doing ‘Zombie-dancing’, a kind of co-ordinated slow exercise dance-thing, which is quite something to see.  In summer we loved cycling the park at night, feeling the energy of this vibrant place.

2. Take the Ferry to Willow Island: from the tall Memorial Monument at the River Park, near the RiverSky Hotel, you can take a ferry to Willow Island across the river for 2¥.  On the Island you are greeted by a minority group who are the last remnants of a Gypsey like people who first lived int his area, hunting and fishing like Eskimo’s.  Now they entertain you with a little Amusement Park, restaurants, horse riding, bicycles for rent and carraige rides.  If you walk past the noise and buzz of the organized amusement, you hit the gravel road and experience a little bit of rural China with 2 little villages, a forrest and large farmlands, cattle and sheep grazing along the way.  Whenever we had time, we would take our bicycles across on the ferry and cycle from one side of the island to picnic and swim on the other side of it.  This is a great day-trip.

3. Enjoy a Picnic at TsiFung Mountain:  TsiFung Mountain has a massive reservoir at its feet and pristine forrest with little paths to picnic spots.  There are boats to rent and restaurants, a wooden walkway on the edge of the water and an old Temple set slightly up its side.  You can take a bus or taxi here.  We’ve even cycled there one sunny summers day.  A large Buddha greets you, as you arrive and at his feet are statues of all the animals of the different Chinese birth-years.  In winter you can ride a snowmobile, tube down a slide, ice skate or even go sledding on the reservoir.  We loved walking in the forest.   Hearing the birds.  Breathing solitude, always amazed that even though this is a densely populated city, none of the places ever feel over-crowded.

4. Play in the Children’s Park: As you arrive at the Children’s Park, you are greeted by the chairman, or rather a statue of him and then you walk past playgrounds,  canals with peddle boats,  pagodas and food-vendors.  The Parks in Jiamusi are many and all of them are well kept, clean and safe.  They are beautiful havens where you see children play, couples whisper sweet nothings and others practicing traditional arts.  TaiKwonDo, Kung Fu, TaiChi.  Music.  Games.  It is in the Parks that we always tasted China’s wealth.  In winter the Children’s Park is transformed into a playground with every imaginable activity you can do on ice, on offer.

5. Visit the Heroes Park: this Park is slightly aside from the city centre, near Jiamusi’s number 16 middle school.  A Park dedicated to a brave Jiamusian who fought during wars with Russians and Japanese.  There are memorial stones, an old tank, an old river boat and along with the Park’s surroundings,  we tasted something here, which we did not taste anywhere else.  Not so many people.  No music.  A quieter place, as if remembering isn’t always pleasant.

6. Enjoy the Public Art at the Memorial Park: The Memorial Park is riddled with monuments and beautiful statues.  It is a stones throw from the very large, very modern New Mart Shopping Mall rising 16 storeys into the air and it remembers the Russians for emancipating this little part of China from the Japanese and their puppet Emperor.  If you’re there, look for the massive ant sculpture and the beautiful woman with the peacock.   In summer fountains dramatically spray into the air and children find relief from the season’s heat.

7. Eat beautiful Food: Hot-Pot, Dumplings, Barbecue,  Beijing Duck and Fabulous Breads. In Jiamusi you’re spoilt for choice when it comes to food and restaurants.  You’ll see the big multi-storey restaurants,with private rooms where you are served by a dedicated team of waiters at no extra charge, from the main streets and when you head down alleys and little roads you’ll stumble onto exquisite family-owned restaurants, each offering something special.  You can try threm.  The food is stunning.  Noodles.  Korean food.  Russian food.  There is even a French Restaurant and a selection of coffee restaurants.  “Summer” is our favorite place for coffee, cake and sandwiches.  Exceptional coffee.  And after dinner Jiamusi offers an Theatre, Cinema and Bowling Lanes for late night entertainment.

8. Shop at the Markets: The Markets in Jiamusi is something to explore.  At the big shopping malls you’ll find all the Western Brands you’ve desired, but at the markets you find treasures at robbery prices.  Be sure to haggle.  If they say it costs 100¥ you should bargain them down to 50¥, they expect you to do that.  There is a massive underground market, built in what I imagine serves as a bomb shelter, stretching kilometres and many streets under the city.  Then there is also the Flea-Market where you’ll find anything from food to household items, around the corner streets with furniture and behind it an 8 storey market filled with clothes and shoes and curtains.  Here you can get a pair of Lee or Tommy Hilfigger Jeans for 100¥ and shoes for even less.

9. See the past at the Museum: The museum doesn’t look like much from the outside, but inside you’ll find pictures and artifacts giving you a feel for the long history of this area, from the time of little fishing villages spotted along the Shongua River, through the revolution, Japanese Occupation, Russian Occupation into more recent days.  The museum is dedicated to a local teacher who lost her legs saving students, her story dipicted as you enter the museum.

10. Amuse yourself at the Zoo: The zoo is right next to a massive Temple and is also host to Jiamusi’s Amusement Park with a fair sized Roller Coaster and pretty big Ferris Wheel as major attractions among all the other Amusement Park kind of stuff.  The zoo itself is forest-like with not too many animals, but enough to make for an interesting afternoon of leisurely walking and playing.

In addition to all of this Jiamusi has interesting architecture.   Two diverse temples.  A little Roman Catholic Church, a larger Evangelical Church and a Mosque.

Just walking the streets is interesting, as old and new and rich and poor exists and lives amongst each other, knit together by the smells and sounds of a hearty people who embrace their bit of world.

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Harbin – a Place of Snow & Trains

Harbin is the capital City of China’s Heilongjiang Province, in the North East of this vast country.

In China it is a medium size city.

It has a population of about 6 million people.

If I’m not mistaken, that’s almost three times the size of a South African city like Johannesburg.

It is famous for its annual Snow & Ice Festival and its Russian Architecture.

The city has its origin in China rubbing shoulders with Russia in the 1890’s, as Russia was building their Trans-Siberian Rail-line.

In 1907 the city had almost 600 000 residents of whom nearly 65% were foreigners.

As we walk the city’s streets, we stumble upon an old (but still active) Turkish Mosque, a beautiful Jewish Hall with red tiles on her walls and a Jewish Hospital, built in the early 1900’s.

The center-piece of the city, St Sophia’s Cathedral.

Our Tribe had the opportunity to spend seven days here, during China’s Spring Festival.

This is a busy time in China, people traveling all over the place to get home & spend time with family, much like Christmas time in South Africa, or what I imagine Thanksgiving to be in America.

We booked our tickets early, boarded the train from Jiamusi to Harbin at about nine one evening and arrived in Harbin the the early hours of the next day.

In China trains serve in 3 classes: seats, hard-sleeper or soft-sleeper.  We took hard-sleeper tickets, which is pretty comfortable and very affordable, if you don’t mind a lack of privacy for a few hours.

The trains are clean and run perfectly on time.

Arriving in a foreign city, where you can communicate with people is one thing, arriving in a city where you cannot speak the language or read any of it, is quite another.

We showed a taxi driver our hotel’s address and, at his grace for lack of linguistic ability and because of eagerness to get our Tribe to our hotel, paid the exorbitant fee he charged for the short drive.

In Harbin, as in most Chinese Cities, Taxis are numerous and Taxi Drivers are a special kind of people, optimizing their profits whenever they see a foreigner, who they know cannot possibly be too picky.

Our Hotel is comfortable.

On the 26th floor of a large new building in the heart of the city.

We’re surrounded by International Brands trying hard to catch the hearts of the Chinese Market.

St Sophia’s Cathedral is a 5 minute walk away, Zoalin Park, where a large display of Snow & Ice Sculptures awiat, is just down the street & Central Street, a beautifully preserved shopping street with cobbled road and old Russian Buildings, is just around the corner.

It is Spring in Harbin, but it is still cold and snowy.  Temperatures hovering around -16ºC.

For which we are grateful, since we are excited to see the massive two and three storey Snow and Ice Sculptures, which would’ve melted, had it been any warmer.

Quickly we familiarize ourselves with the public transport system of the city, which includes busses and subway trains, hoping to save ourselves from the entrepreneurial spirit of the taxi drivers.

We take the bus to the Golden Dragon Tower, Asia’s highest steel structure (higher than Paris’ Eifel Tower).  We walk the glass floor, see the 3D museum, view the city from up high.

The views are amazing.  The experience, something we never dreamed we would enjoy.

The feelings of vertigo cancelled by the exquisiteness of experiencing something together – something not described in Western Travel brochures or written about in travel magazines.

From the Tower we walk the precinct. We visit the most amazing City Library.  It is open 24 hours of every day.  It has elevators, bookshops, a food-court and is a hive of activity.

Then we discover an old Russian Palace with regal decoration and massive fish-tanks.  As we walk this monarchical remembrance we can hear old kings making plans and deals, as they build the world’s longest railway line across country borders.

The bus ride costs 1¥.

Public transport is cheap in China and with the help of Google-maps we know which bus to take and where to catch it.  Just make sure you get a good VPN, before you come to China, as Google is blocked and without a VPN you won’t be able to access any of the information.

Beate has an iPhone.  The maps on it isn’t blocked by the great firewall, but it lacks the public transport information offered by Google Maps.  Maybe iPhone users don’t ride the bus or subway?

We lunch at a little noodle shop, rest for a while in our comfortable rooms and reconvene in the late afternoon, hungry to experience as much of this city, as we can, in the seven days we have.

With the sun setting we walk around the corner to Central Street.

There are amazing sculptures everywhere.

Beate, our fellow-traveler who has lived in Germany, The Netherlands,  the UK and United States, comments that the street makes her feel as if she is walking in an old European City, hidden away from time.

The old fashioned Russian music playing in the background, adding to the atmosphere.

We take her word for it.

It is definitely not the China most people imagine.

The feel of the city, its atmosphere is tantelizing.

The mixture of culture and memory energizing.

We look for a hidden away local restaurant to have dinner.  We are hungry, after a day’s experiences.

We find the perfect spot, which we revisit a few times during our stay in Harbin.

It is unpretentious.   The food is amazing.  The proprietors friendly.  It is everything we hope, as we walk new roads.

I take a quick respite from our stay in Harbin to fetch our son from Beijing.  He’d been visiting family back home, enjoying Africa’s Summer.  I take the fast-train from Harbin West Station to Beijing.  The train travels at 200 km/h, reducing the trip to 8 hours travel time.

The train station has the feel of an International Airport.  Large.  Clean.  Well organized, with lots of international brands offered in all the different shops.

Late that evening we fly back from Beijing to Harbin.  A two and a half hour flight.

If you decide to travel to Harbin, you’ll probably fly into Beijing.  Taking a flight is easy.  Domestic Departures are close to International Arrivals and the Airport offers a free shuttle to the apropriate terminal.

If you want to take the fast train, that is easy enough too, and it costs about a third of what a plane ticket would put you back, with the bonus of seeing something of the Chinese Countryside along the way.  To catch the train, you need to get to Beijing Station.  You could take a shuttle for about 200¥, or you could take the subway, which is very easy to navigate and will cost only 28¥, including the first leg of your trip on the special Airport Express.

In Harbin you should set at least an afternoon aside to spend at St Sophia’s Cathedral.

The Cathedral survived the cultural revolution and is now a museum with loads of pictures depicting this city’s rich history.

We are fascinated.

Not only by the pictures, but also by how much of this old Orthodox Cathedral remains and how the Chinese government embraces every inch of the country’s history, giving honor to the people who built the city with effort and innovation.

In 1900 Harbin was a modern city with electric streetcars, electricity and the amenities you would find in London and New York.

The Cathedral always at the heart of activity.

Sun Island is where the major action is, if you want to see the magnificent snow & ice sculptures.

You can take a bus there.  Or a taxi.  Or you could take a cable-car from Swan Castle, across the river to the Island.

That’s what we do.

For Maddi it is her first time in a cable car.

The rest of the Tribe had been to Table Mountain, for all of us it is our first cable-car ride in China.

We share a car with a family from Shanghai.

People from all over China come to Harbin to enjoy the experience it has to offer.

Once on Sun Island, it is difficult to eecide where to start exploring.

The Island isn’t just host to the Snow & Ice Festival.

We start our day at the Russian Village, recreated from original Timber Buildings which used to be in the city.

It is a bit like a museum-village, with Russians in most structures.  One a bakery, the other a home, another a bar or a doctor’s office, a school house and in every building old furniture from the period.

Then there is Polarland.

An amazing Aquarium with fantastical shows of Sea Lion & Beluga Whales.

We see Polar Bears, Penguin, Otters, beautifully created and maintained polar fish displays.

We spend an entire afternoon watching shows and fish and whales, feeding animals and experiencing something stunning.

I love the Beluga Whale show with two Beluga Whales and divers.

It is different from the stuff you see at other aquariums.

Here spectators stand next to a massive wall of glass & the whales perform, alongside their trainers in diving gear, under water.

It leaves you breathless.

Maddi loved the Sea Lion Show.

All shows are bilingual.

Russian and Chinese.

The crowds are massive.

The experience well worth the cost of the tickets, which includes everything, except refreshments.

In Zoalin Park we had our first taste of Ice Sculptures.

Everything from cars to surfers and mermaids.

On Sun Island the scale is massive.

Most sculptures being two or three storeys high.

You should do Zoalin Park one evening, but if you didn’t see the Snow & Ice Sculptures on Sun Island, you did not see what this festival is about.

Seven days is a good time to spend in Harbin.

You need time to walk the streets.

At least, that’s how we enjoy a city.

All over the place there are amazing monuments and statues.

Exquisite, tree-lined  pedestrian streets.

Restaurants with tasty food.

We ride the city’s new and modern subway.

Not just to get around, but also as we make our way back to the train station, on our last day, as we head back to Jiamusi.

For a city with 6 million people, we are surprised to find it uncongested, spacious and clean.

Running on time, costing only 2¥.

We tried to visit Harbin’s Amusement Park, but that will have to be a Summer trip.

In the North of China, it seems, Amusement Parks close down for the winter.

It’ll be worth coming back, even if only to ride the Big Wheel Carousel,  which is bigger than London Eye.

And to get some more ground coffee, butter and cheese, which is readily available here, but not so easily obtainable in Jiamusi.

Maybe you’ll never make it to this part of the world?

For us it was good to see and taste a world which flourished with international cooperation,  while our own world was at war with Britain,  struggling to hang on to something which, perhaps, should never have been, or at least should not have been the place of death and injustice it became as it was fed by colonial hunger.

I imagine the Russians had a similar colonial incentive, building their railway?

How different, however, it came to be, as people greeted each other & worked together, to create something.

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Shuangyashan, Heilongjiang, Northern China

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It has been a while since we let you know of the Adventures of the Traveling Tribe.

We are from Nelson Mandela Bay, in the Eastern Cape of South Africa.

We live in Jiamusi, in Siberian China.

Tasting a different Far-Far East.

Recently we traveled to Shuangyashan & discovered beautiful people & stunning places.

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It was early morning when we left for Jiamusi’ s train station.

Train travel is inexpensive, here. We paid 8Y per ticket, for the 2 hour ride which would take us to Shuangyashan.

This was a first for us.

Taking the train in China.

We were a bit nervous of crowds & finding the right train on the right platform.

It remains quite a thing that we cannot read Chinese.  Try to find your way & use public transport without being able to read anything!  Or even ask for help.  After 4 months in China we can say ‘hello’ & ask ‘how are you’ in Chinese.  We can ask you about your day or how yoir family is & we can even respond in perfect Chinese, should you be so kind as to enquire.  We can bargain for better prices, understanding numbers & we’ve become proficient in gestures, but none of that helps you if you have to catch a train from a station with many platforms.

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We did it though.

We arrived at the station just after 4 and at about 5 we were on our way.

With the help of very friendly staff who saw that these foreigners might just end-up in Harbin or Beijing, if left to their own devices.

The train was clean & comfortable.  The views of rural China, exquisite.

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We saw the most beautiful sunrise over farmland.

Little villages all along the line.

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Ting-Ting & her husband met us in Shuangyashan.

I remain constantly overwhelmed by the warmth & kindness of the people we meet here in the far north east of this massive country.

We’ve never met Ting-Ting or her husband Tang.

They are friends of friends we’ve made in Jiamusi, yet they’ve cleared their schedules for 3 days, in order to take us around & show us their bit of world.

After 3 days, they are friends.

I love seeing peoples’ worlds.

By Chinese standards, Shuangyashan is a small town, home to perhaps 500 000 people.

Here China & Russia rubs shoulders, daily busses bringing Russians to the city for shopping on a short 2 hour ride.

Everywhere, everything is marked in Chinese & Russian.

And everybody asumes we are ‘Ruskies’.

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We arrive in Shuangyashan,  just after 7.

We share breakfast, my first experience of Chinese porridge,  which is very different from the porridge we know.  It is more like a soup, with rice & vegetables & meat.  With it we have dumplings, fantastic bread, for which this part of China is famous & some fish as well.

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Then we head out into the countryside.

Our first stop is a reservoir which feeds the farming community & city.

They say Chairman Mao once swam here.

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It is beautiful & we end up being cajoled into joining a group of locals playing old fashioned games.

Zuko & I enter the three-legged race & to everyone’s delight we win by a wide margin.

I thank the crowd, in my best Chinese, for their kindness, saying we are happy to be here & share their joy, before receiving our prize.

Pictures are taken.

Friendly conversations are had.  Conversations of which we understand nothing more than they are friendly & kind & inquisitive.

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Then we head for the forest, where we will have a picnic lunch.

Along the way we stop at a village of small farmers, bee-keepers & foresters.

It blows us away.

The beauty.

The care taken in creating a home for people of little means & less influence.

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We take a rest & then we head into the forest itself, walking up a small hill, along a well kept boardwalk, to a beautiful pagoda, from where we can see amazing vistas.

We eat.

We rest.

We talk.

Ting-Ting speaks good English & she is keen to practice.

Out here in the north there isn’t much opportunity to speak English.

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After lunch we make our way to a Temple.

The forest has a temple as well, but we drive past it, Tang hoping to show us the bigger temple of the goddess of a thousand hands.

He tells us she is the goddess of grace.

In each hand she holds something she would like to give.

In kindness.

To the people.

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As we walk through the temple, Tang explains every alcove & place of offering.

People are praying.

For health.

For wealth.

For good fortune.

At the top of the Temple Complex we see the Bhuda.

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I am amazed at the lengths our kind go too, in order to feel connected to our Origin.

Reminded that all of us long to know our Creator.

To feel sheltered by our Source.

From the Temple we make our way to Tang’s family home.

This is special.

It is reserved for very special people to be invited to the family home.

Tang’s family are farmers.

They live in a little compound, among many more little compounds, from where they farm communal land, alongside others.

We make dumplings together.

Tang’s Aunt preparing dinner since early afternoon.

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Then dinner is served.

Dinner, in China starts early.

No later than five-thirty.

And it is a slow, relaxed affair,  with many toasts & easy conversation.

The table is heavy with scrumptious food.

Ting-Ting translates for us, so we can connect with their family.

Tang’s uncle declares that we are now close friends, for it is only close friends who’ve been to their home.

We express gratitude & complement Tang’s Aunt on delectable fair.

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We eat outside, the cool Spring breeze contributing to the warmth of our experience.

We are reminded of what it is which is important.

Not oppulance or accumelated riches, locked away wealth, but hospitality & generosity,  kindness & love.

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By seven-thirty we retire to our hotel.

It has been a long first day in Shuangyashan.

Tomorrow we’ll head to Tsi Fung Mountain, climbing the highest peak in Heilongjiang Province.

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Tang & Ting-Ting meet us at the hotel, just after eight.

We grab a quick breakfast & then we drive out to the mountain.

It is about a 30 minute drive & on our own we would not have found it.

We see a city being rebuilt & modernized.  Along the way I count 17 high rise cranes.  One building site has 9 multi-story towers, reaching 30 floors into the clouds.

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The walk up the mountain is easy enough.

The conservation area extremely clean & well kept despite the number of people who visit this area every day.

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We spend the day here.

It takes us about 2 hours to walk to the top where we rest, before coming down again.

Along the way people greet & try to talk.

They tell us how beautiful Maddi is & every few steps we stop for pictures with people we’ve never met.

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At the top of the mountain we rest.

Then we climb along a treacherous chain to the very top, from where you can see almost the whole province.

It is magnificent.

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It is stunning how doing things together, how sharing an experience, brings people together, binds our souls.

Our friendship with Ting-Ting & Tang & their family growing deeper with every step we share up the mountain.

On the way back to the hotel everyone is quiet.

Tired.

In a good way.

We share dinner at a beautiful restaurant.

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Barbeque style.

In a private room.

You’ll love the restaurants in China.

They’re places where you have time.

And intimacy.

Most of them have private rooms with a dedicated waitress & tonight they grill our food at our table.

Restaurants aren’t expensive.

The 12 of us have a stunning meal for 350Y.

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After dinner we find a spot with ice-cream for the kids, coffee for Zuko & whiskey for me, with some live music added to the mix.

It is the perfect end to a wonderful day.

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Our third day in Shuangyashan starts with another scrumptious breakfast.

We do a bit of a breakfast crawl.

First we find coffee, which is special, since coffee is not  normal in this part of China.

Then we find breakfast.

Then we head to the Park.

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We spend an entire day taking amusement park rides & eating amusement park food.

We laugh.

We are silly.

We eat copious amounts of snacks.

We see animals.

Lovely people.

We ride bumper cars & boats & roller coasters.

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It is late afternoon when we head to the train station.

Late evening when we arrive in Jiamusi.

We don’t know if you’ll ever be in this part of the Far East, but if you are fortunate enough to have the opportunity, it is a place where you will find beauty beyond reason.

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Ice Fun

Earlier this week we discovered Jiamusi’s Children’s Park.

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It was Theunsie, our son’s, 14th birthday.

We wanted to do something special.

He’d been wanting to ice skate since we got here & so we decided his birthday is the ideal opportunity to explore the Ice Fun created in this famous park.

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It isn’t far from where we live.

Jiamusi is a compact city.

Nothing more than 10 kilometres away.

The Children’s Park is a short 3.5 kilometres from our home.

An easy walk.

Except for the -28 degrees celcius temperature, which we’re getting used to, although little Maddi still struggles to control her little body’s heat.

So Beate, Wilhelmina & I decided we’ll walk, while Zuko, Maddi, Theunsie & Sophia follow in a taxi-cab.

Taxi-cabs are abundant in Jiamusi.

They’re everywhere.

And they’re cheap.

The drive from our home to the park costing only 8Yuan.

I like walking a city.

You see more of it.

Experience more of it.

Notice more, as you slowly make your way, on foot, from one street to the next.

Jiamusi has beautiful architecture,  sprinkled in between the more mundane modern buildings.

The city is well kept.

The streets are clean, naked trees, in tidy rows, patiently waiting for summer all along the way.

At the entrance of the park we are greeted by a statue of the Chairman.

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Nope, that’s not it.  It is a statue at a Bhuddist Temple  we visited, which my tablet inserted, for some stupid reason & I can’t seem to remove it from this post.

I’ll tell you about the Temple in another post.

Back to the Park.

It is situated close to some University buildings.

It sports an art centre.

Beautiful bridges & I can I imagine in summer people will enjoy rowing quant boats on the lake, while others play music or picnic in the shade of the many trees & pagodas.

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Today the lake is frozen.

Solid.

Huge ramps allow children to fly down the ice, on inflatable tubes at breakneck speeds.

There’s a skating rink.

Some ‘snowmobiles’, chair skiing & an area where they play an interesting local game with whips and a spinning top.

Fascinating.

Popular Chinese music fill the air, along with excited chatter & children’s laughter.

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Zuko & Maddi fly down the ramp on a tube.

Fluffy snow spattering in their wake as they speed by.

Then the game is on.

The other kids and Beate chasing each other from one icy ramp to the next.

After an hour or so, Zuko & Maddi seek refuge in the cabin where the ice skates & other items are being rented out.

The local ladies are friendly & chatty and although we really don’t u derstand a word they say, we know they think Maddi is addorable.

We know they’re stunned at the size of our family & fascinated by these foreigners who’ve chosen to come and live amongst them for a time.

They make space for Zuko in front of a warm heater while the rest of us skate & ski & glide on ice.

Races are done.

Skates & skiing chairs exchanged.

Energy expended on experiencing a world unknown to us.

My mustache collect icy crystals and my feet become numb on the cold of the frozen lake.

We’re amazed by the immense fun we have.

And as the sun starts to set, which is quite early in this Siberian part of the world in Northern China, we head home where Maddi takes a warm bath & then a solid nap, while we talk about the amazingness we experienced & Zuko cooks a beautiful meal.

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Perceptions & Misconceptions

Nope.  The city where we live is not polluted.

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This is Wilhelmina & Sophia.

Yip, they’re wearing face masks.

But not because of polution.

Because of the cold.

It is so terribly cold, if I walk around without a face mask, the beads on my beard are frozen solid in less than a kilometre.

Yet, on every website & every blog I read, before coming to China, if I saw people with face masks, it was associated to pollution.

Don’t get me wrong.

Jiamusi is a city of almost 1.6 million people.

By Chinese standards, that’s a small city.

And there are industry here.

The very famous American John Deere is built here.

There’s also logging and a paper mill.

A wind farm.

A pharmaceutical plant.

But it is small in comparison to the industry of our home city.

Another misconception we contemplated was the absence of bread.

On the ground floor of the building in which I teach there is a stunning pastry shop, the aroma of which contends for my last yuan, every day.

Every supermarket has a bakery.

And carry flour on their shelves.

And off course, Chinese people eat dog?

Nope.

We’ve not seen dog meat for sale.  I imagine you could find it.  Somewhere.  But we’ve only seen chicken, pork, beef & the most amazing array of live seafood.

And exquisite pasta.

They call it noodles, but it’s pasta.

Tasty pasta.

Everyone was right about the cold though.

That was no misconception.

And it is a bit tough to catch a bus.

Although they drive by every 5 minutes, as regular as clock work, we have no idea where they’re heading.

And so we opt for Jiamusi’s version of New York’s yellow taxi cabs.  They’re blue & silver.  They cost 6Y kr R10 or less than a dollar,  no matter where you’re heading, too.

And we can show them a piece of paper with the address of our destination.

And they take us right to our doorstep.

Categories: Asian Adventure | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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